How an airconditioning mechanic working in Sydney Australia became an award winning broadcaster in Britain. – Part 5.

29Oct13

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“Feelin’ nearly faded as my jeans”, is a great line from the song “Me and Bobby Mcgee”. That’s exactly how I felt that day in 1992. My only hope of getting into radio full time was to be accepted as a student at the Australian Film Television and Radio School. That seemed highly unlikely; the audition demo I’d recorded at 2SM in Sydney was awful. Now I was supposed to send the cassette of it to AFTRS.

Staring at the tape which, was sitting on top of the scripts I’d read so badly in the audition, I had a thought. “I know I can do better, what if I re-record it?”

The biggest problem was the script for a commercial for the “Awesome Aussie Barbecue Company”. The copy read, “You’d have to be a dead set, drongo not take advantage of the, fair dinkum, true blue, dinky-die deals”. How could I make that sound right in my English accent?

I still had a reasonably good microphone left over from the days when I used to sing in a band. I plugged it into my second hand four track cassette machine, used the mixer on it to get the eq sounding about right in my headphones, plugged the four track into my stereo, popped a cassette in there and hit record. Our flat wasn’t a soundproof recording studio so I threw a blanket over my head and read the scripts by the light of a torch.

When I got to the barbecue script, I read it straight, with my English accent until I got to the really Aussie bits. For those bits I bunged on a thick, Aussie twang. So in my English accent I said, “You’d have to be a…” then dropped into Aussie “… dead set, drongo”  back to English “…not take advantage of the…” Aussie again, “fair dinkum, true blue, dinky-die deals”. It worked.

So now I had an audition that I was happy with and a dilemma. Do I send AFTRS the re-recorded demo or the original? I still felt guilty about pretending I’d typed out the thousand word essay at the first stage of the application process. If I send them the re-record and they find out, I won’t get on the course. Then again, if I send them the original, I won’t get on the course.

There’s another great line in “Me and Bobby Mcgee”, “Freedom’s just another word for nothing left to lose”.

Craic on!

Check out the latest Mack Nuggets at http://www.mackmedia.co.uk

 



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